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Q&As

Context. Insight. Behind-the-scenes info.

Our regular Q&A screenings sell out quickly, so get booking when you see one advertised in our weekly newsletter (sign up in the box in the left hand sidebar). The Lexi is the perfect, intimate venue for Q&As; our guests love the place – and we know they also appreciate that Lexi cinema guests are film fans who know their stuff, and ask intelligent, original and entertaining questions. Apart from our own regular on-site Q&As, we regularly broadcast live-by-satellite Q&As and introductions, pre- or post-film.

DocHouse: Dangerous Acts

STOP PRESS:  We will now be joined for a Q&A after the screening by Mike Harris, former Head of Advocacy at Index on Censorship and a Belarus human rights campaigner.

DocHouse presents this festival award-winning film starring satirical theatre group The Unstable Elements.

“An admirable document of courage and resistance.” The Hollywood Reporter

Director Madeleine Sackler goes behind the scenes to cover a dramatic year in the life of an acclaimed troupe of imaginative and subversive performers who defy Europe’s last remaining dictatorship, that of two-decade Belarus president Alexander Lukashenko.  Creating provocative theatre carries great personal risks: emotional, financial and artistic. For the members of the Belarus Free Theatre, however, there are additional risks: censorship, imprisonment – and worse.

Comprised of smuggled footage and uncensored interviews, Dangerous Acts is an astonishing piece of political cinema, giving audiences a front row seat to a resistance movement as it unfolds both on the stage and in the streets.  As members of the Free Theatre confront the choice of either repression at home or exile in the US and the UK, this film reconfirms our belief that the power of dare and hope can, indeed, change the world.

DocHouse is a year-round festival of weekly international documentary screenings in UK cinemas. Established for over ten years through events, masterclasses, festivals and education outreach, DocHouse has achieved a high profile within the documentary community and beyond, raising public awareness of documentary across the UK. For information on all our screenings, visit our website www.dochouse.org

 

Dirty Wars – followed by director + panel

Followed by a live panel discussion hosted by Reprieve UK.

Investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill stumbles upon a US night raid gone badly wrong in a remote corner of Afghanistan, where a witness swears to having seen American soldiers digging bullets out of the bodies of pregnant dead women.

Intent on exposing the truth, Scahill is drawn into a dark and disquieting world of covert operations underpinning the ‘War on Terror’—unknown to the public, and carried out across the globe by men who do not exist on paper and may never be held to account.  “A  gripping investigative doc, which plays out like a classic conspiracy thriller as it follows a trail of clues to the heart of darkness.” Time Out

Reprieve executive director Clare Algar will chair the panel, which includes director Rick Rowley and Mark Pyman, director of the defence and security programme at Transparency International.



Which Way Is Front Line from Here?Life+Time of Tim Hetherington

Presented by Between the Lines, with a live Q&A with producer James Brabazon afterwards.

An award-winning war photojournalist and filmmaker, Tim Hetherington was considered by many to be one of the most impactful visual artists of recent times. At 40 years old and after years of covering conflicts from Liberia to Afghanistan he met his untimely death from a mortar blast in Libya in 2011.

Renowned for the rare intimacy he achieved with those he captured on camera, Hetherington’s work sought a quieter reflection on the human experience of war. In 2010, shortly before his death, Hetherington made the Oscar-nominated film Restrepo, which explored his fascination with how war creates powerful bonds between men and the terrifying normality of conflict for soldiers.  Through interviews with family and friends, personal footage, and Hetherington’s unique archive of visual imagery, his Restrepo co-director, Sebastian Junger, pays fitting tribute to a respected friend and colleague.

James Brabazon is a frontline journalist and documentary filmmaker; a friend and colleague of Tim Hetherington as well as the producer of this film.   He has made over thirty international current affairs films, winning awards including the Rory Peck Trust Sony International Impact Award 2003 and the IDA Courage Under Fire Award 2004.

About Between the Lines:  In a series of follow up events in cinemas around London, we continue to explore the challenges facing documentary makers, investigative journalists and citizen reporters in the new media landscape. Find out more at www.betweenthelinesfest.com.

When The Dragon Swallowed The Sun – followed by panel discussion

STOP PRESS – live panel discussion following Mon 9 Sep screening.  Also showing on Wed, 11 Sep

Seven years in the making, When The Dragon Swallowed The Sun is the first inside look at the Tibetan movement to free Tibet, and its internal conflicts and contradictions.  It presents the complexity of the struggle with breath-taking footage from India, China, Tibet and the US; a prologue narrated by Dennis Haysbert; and an original soundtrack by Philip Glass, Thom Yorke and Damien Rice. The film features, among others, Richard Gere, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and the Dalai Lama along with all the key figures of the exiled Tibetan freedom movement.

On our panel following Monday’s screening will be writer Kate Saunders, Communications Director for the International Campaign for Tibet, an international monitoring and advocacy organization. Kate’s articles have been published in newspapers and magazines including the Times, the Independent, the Guardian, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of India, and South China Morning Post. She has authored or co-authored numerous reports on Tibet and the book Eighteen Layers of Hell: Stories from the Chinese Gulag (Cassell, 1996).


 

Josie Long : Let’s go Adventure Tour

Award-winning comedian Josie Long will introduce this project which is close to her heart, and afterwards she + the films’ director, Douglas King, will do a Q&A. Last year the pair made two short comedy films in Glasgow, called Let’s Go Swimming and Romance and Adventure, which were nominated for a BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award and can be viewed here tonight as part of the Let’s Go Adventure screening tour.

Josie Long has been described as a unique voice in the business. She creates a buzz everywhere she goes with obsessive and ridiculous stories, leaving audiences smitten with her innocent wonder and loveable madness. A (young) veteran of stand-up, radio and television, her second show, Trying Is Good, was released on DVD in 2008 and her third, All of the Planet’s Wonders (Shown in Detail), was broadcast as a radio series. Her shows are about fostering curiosity and enthusiasm, self-improvement and teaching yourself as much as is possible.


The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology +Satellite Q&A with Slavoj Žižek

The imp of semiotic mischief himself - C – will be speaking live-via-satellite afterwards.

The sequel to The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema sees the reunion of brilliant philosopher Slavoj Žižekwith filmmaker Sophie Fiennes, now using their inventive interpretation of moving pictures to examine ideology – the collective fantasies that shape our beliefs and practices.

It is a sequel to Fiennes’ 2006 documentary The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema. Though the film follows the frameworks of its predecessor, this time the emphasis is more on ideology itself.

Through psychoanalysis Žižek explores “the mechanisms that shape what we believe and how we behave”.  Among the films that are explored are Full Metal Jacket , Taxi Driver, A Brief Encounter, M*A*S*H, and many more examples of how the Pleasure Principle is used to control and manipulate our psyches.  Prepare to be stimulated and provoked, occasionally amused, and completely  engaged!

 

Hawking+satellite Q&A with Stephen Hawking+ guests

Live satellite Q&A with Stephen Hawking + friends after the film

Told in his own words and by those closest to him, Hawking follows Stephen Hawking’s journey from boyhood underachiever to paradigm-changing genius,with Motor Neurone disease a major obstacle along the way. Despite the constant threat of death, Hawking has risen to fame and international recognition and continues to make scientific discoveries.  Audiences across the country will be joining him and his special guests live from the opening night of Cambridge Film Festival, with a live/satellite Q&A following the gala premiere of Stephen Finnigan’s fascinating documentary.

From Flixist:

“Stephen Hawking has always struck me as simultaneously tragic and yet inspiring. Diagnosed with ALS in his early 20s — basically a death sentence — he’s beaten the odds for five decades. Even as the Motor Neurone has progressed and diminished his mobility further and further, he remains one of the most brilliant and influential theoretical physicists in the world.

“As many mention in Stephen Finnigan’s biodoc Hawking, it’s as if the man’s thinking was taken to a new level as his motor skills and ability to write dissipated. We don’t get as much breakdown of the science in this documentary, and there’s no mention of Errol Morris’s A Brief History of Time, the 1991 documentary on Hawking and his seminal book of the same name. Yet what Finnigan provides is a personal look at the life of the genius.”

 

 

 

When The Dragon Swallowed The Sun

STOP PRESS – live panel discussion following Mon 9 Sep screening

Seven years in the making, When The Dragon Swallowed The Sun is the first inside look at the Tibetan movement to free Tibet, and its internal conflicts and contradictions.  It presents the complexity of the struggle with breath-taking footage from India, China, Tibet and the US; a prologue narrated by Dennis Haysbert; and an original soundtrack by Philip Glass, Thom Yorke and Damien Rice. The film features, among others, Richard Gere, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and the Dalai Lama along with all the key figures of the exiled Tibetan freedom movement.

On our panel following Monday’s screening will be writer Kate Saunders, Communications Director for the International Campaign for Tibet, an international monitoring and advocacy organization. Kate’s articles have been published in newspapers and magazines including the Times, the Independent, the Guardian, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of India, and South China Morning Post. She has authored or co-authored numerous reports on Tibet and the book Eighteen Layers of Hell: Stories from the Chinese Gulag (Cassell, 1996).

 

A Field In England + SATELLITE Q&A with director Ben Wheatley

Live satellite Q&A with Ben Wheatley afterward. Tickets for Encore screening, including Q&A, Sat 6th July 21:00 and without Q&A on Sun 7th July 17:30.

“Ben Wheatley’s strangest movie yet: mysticism, mystification and magic mushrooms in an English Civil War setting.  Often confusing, occasionally infuriating – but audaciously original.” Phillip Kemp, Total Film

“A head-spinning trip in to the far corners of the English psyche.” Danny Leigh, Film 2013

Director Ben Wheatley (Kill List, Sightseers) proves once again that he’s one of the most exciting and unpredictable talents in film today with this nightmarish black comedy. In 1648 during the Civil War, a group of deserters flee a bloody battle. They stumble into a field, where an alchemist tricks them into eating hallucinogenic mushrooms before forcing them to look for ‘treasure’. What follows is both eerily beautiful and deeply unsettling.

 

 

The Act of Killing: Directors Cut – with panel

STARTING AT 19:30.  PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGE FROM PROGRAMME.

Film followed by a live panel discussion. Also showing 21 and 24 July

“I have not seen a film as powerful, surreal and frightening in at least a decade.” Werner Herzog

Following the Indonesian military coup of 1965, paramilitaries helped the army to massacre more than a million alleged communists in less than a year.  To this day, these shocking acts are portrayed domestically as a patriotic struggle, and their perpetrators are celebrated as national heroes.  Documentarist Joshua Oppenheimer’s attempts to tell the tale of the genocide’s survivors were obstructed by the Indonesian authorities – but the killers themselves proved happy to appear on film.  He invited the perpetrators to stage filmed re-enactments of their killings, with a twist: they would be performed in the style of their favourite Hollywood genre films. The incredible result is a hallucinatory journey into the minds of mass killers, and a staggering testament to the frighteningly banal culture of impunity they continue to inhabit.

The panel will be comprised of:  Ben Murtagh, Senior Lecturer in Indonesian and Malay, Department of South East Asia, SOAS, University of London; Professor John Taylor (Development Studies at LSBU); and Professor Joram Ten Brink, one of the film’s producers and Director of Centre for Production and Research in Documentary Film at the University of Westminster.

 

 

 

A Field In England + encore Q + A with director Ben Wheatley

Live satellite Q&A with Ben Wheatley afterward Fri 5th July 18:30; Screening, Sun 7 July 17:30

“Ben Wheatley’s strangest movie yet: mysticism, mystification and magic mushrooms in an English Civil War setting.  Often confusing, occasionally infuriating – but audaciously original.” Phillip Kemp, Total Film

“A head-spinning trip in to the far corners of the English psyche.” Danny Leigh, Film 2013

Director Ben Wheatley (Kill List, Sightseers) proves once again that he’s one of the most exciting and unpredictable talents in film today with this nightmarish black comedy. In 1648 during the Civil War, a group of deserters flee a bloody battle. They stumble into a field, where an alchemist tricks them into eating hallucinogenic mushrooms before forcing them to look for ‘treasure’. What follows is both eerily beautiful and deeply unsettling.

 

 

DocHouse: Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law

A DocHouse presentation, followed by a live Q&A with Beatrice Mtetwa herself and director Lorie Conway.

Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law documentary features one of the bravest lawyers in Africa — Beatrice Mtetwa in Zimbabwe. In spite of harassment and beatings by police, she has courageously defended those jailed by the Mugabe government—peace activists, journalists, opposition candidates, farmers who had their land confiscated, and ordinary citizens who had the courage to speak up. Despite multiple arrests herself (most recently in March 2013, pictured right) she continues to fight to uphold the rule of law which she believes in passionately.

Through interviews with Mtetwa and some of her defendants, the film tells the story of what happens when rulers place themselves above the law, and why defence of the rule of law is a crucial step in the building of a civil society.   As Zimbabwe faces a presidential election in 2013, the filmmakers hope that Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law will spark dialogue and change in the country and throughout Africa, while also bringing the story of this inspiring woman to the attention of the rest of the world.

Although her arena is Zimbabwe, Mtetwa’s message and bravery are universal!

DocHouse is a year-round festival of weekly international documentary screenings in UK cinemas. Established for over ten years through events, masterclasses, festivals and education outreach, DocHouse has achieved a high profile within the documentary community and beyond, raising public awareness of documentary across the UK. For information on all our screenings, visit our website www.dochouse.org