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What’s On

Official Bar Launch: The Big Lebowski

Maude Lebowski: What do you do for recreation?

The Dude: Oh, the usual. I bowl. Drive around.  Take it easy at the Lexi bar.  The occasional acid flashback.

For the official launch of our new bar it could only be our perennial favourite, The Big Lebowski! On release in 1998 it was received with some critical disappointment – the Coen brothers’ previous film had been Oscar winner Fargo, after all – but this loopy shaggy dog story of mistaken identity and a stolen rug has proved the most enduring of all the brothers’ films.

Usual Lexi dress code applies:  dressing gowns and bowling shirts welcome.  We will be sampling White Russians while nibbling on canapes from The Island, and we are currently auditioning rugs – to tie the new bar together, of course.   In the best spirit of The Dude, keep your minds loose and your cocktail glasses topped up. Celebrate with us:  the Lexi abides!

 


 

Glitterball

Kids Club, £5

Quite possibly the most endearing Children’s Film Foundation entry, this low-budget award-winning charmer sees an alien left behind on a very 1970s Planet Earth, with only two young boys for company. While this alien comes in the very pocketable form of a little silver ball, it will eat through anything — which is why local thief Filthy wants to get his grubby hands on it!  Cynics have suggested this may have inspired Scorcese’s ET!

 

NT Live: Skylight

NT Live presents.  Encores are the live performance recorded from the stage of Wyndhams Theatre, with all the extras.  Wed 6 Aug is now sold out but we have excellent seats available for Tue 5 Aug.

On a bitterly cold London evening, schoolteacher Kyra Hollis receives an unexpected visit from her former lover, Tom Sergeant, a successful and charismatic restaurateur whose wife has recently died.  As the evening progresses, the two attempt to rekindle their once passionate relationship only to find themselves locked in a dangerous battle of opposing ideologies and mutual desires.

Bill Nighy, whose film credits include Love Actually and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, stars alongside Carey Mulligan (Inside Llewyn DavisThe Great GatsbyAn Education) making her West End stage debut. They are joined by Matthew Beard (An EducationOne DayThe Look of Love).

Skylight is directed by Stephen Daldry who recently directed the sell-out West End production of The Audience and whose award-winning stage work also includes An Inspector Calls and Billy Elliot the Musical.

David Hare is the author of 29 plays for stage including PlentyRacing DemonAmy’s ViewThe Blue RoomThe Judas KissPravda (with Howard Brenton) and, most recently,South Downs. His many screenplays include The Hours and The Reader.

Skylight was originally produced in 1995 at The National Theatre before transferring to the West End and Broadway. It was that year’s recipient of the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Play.

Finding Fela

“There’s nothing like seeing Fela himself – blowing his sax, expressing his unbridled sexuality and living a life like no other.” New York Daily News

Oscar winning director Alex Gibney’s documentary is a sweeping portrait of the artist as guerilla warrior. Set to the insistent groove of Nigerian superstar Fela Kuti’s revolutionary Afrobeat sound, the remarkable story of one man’s courageous stand against a corrupt and dictatorial government gives testament to the transformative power of music as a force of social and political unification.. His influence helped bring democracy in Nigeria and promoted Pan Africanist politics, and it continues to set a powerful example today.

 

The Keeper Of Lost Causes

School of Scandi noir and based on the international best seller by novelist Jussi Adler-Olsen, this was the most popular film in Denmark last year.  And we know what a discerning audience those Danes are when it comes to crime crossed with social critique!

When Chief Detective Carl Mørck returns to duty after prolonged sick leave he  is given responsibility for the newly established Department Q, a department for old unsolved cases, consisting only of himself and his new assistant Assad.   Morck recognises this for the career cold store that it is, but he stubbornly persists in taking the job seriously.  Before long he and Assad  are up to their necks in a five-year-old case concerning the mysterious disappearance of politician Merete Lynggaard – a quest that dumps them deep into the corruption lurking beneath the polished surfaces of Scandinavian society.