WHAT'S ON

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What’s On

Believe

Set in 1984 Manchester, Believe is a funny and touching fictional tale about the legendary Manchester United football manager, Sir Matt Busby. An act of petty crime by 11 year old Georgie becomes a collision of fate as Sir Matt tracks him down, only to discover that the boy is an extraordinarily gifted footballer and captain of a team of unruly talents.

Having lived with football all his life and survived the tragic 1958 Munich Air Disaster, in which eight of his players were killed, Sir Matt is still committed to continue his work of “training lads for life” and so begins a thrilling adventure as he comes out of retirement to transform a young group of scallywags into a dream team.

 

Finding Vivian Maier

“More connect-the-dots detective thriller than traditional doc, John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s revelatory riddle of a film unmasks a brilliant photographer who hid in plain sight for decades” Entertainment Weekly

This documentary is a tribute to Vivian Maier, an unsung genius of urban photography. The accidental discovery of her work by real-estate agent John Maloof resulted in her posthumous recognition as one of the finest street photographers of the 20th century.

Paying homage to her work as well as exploring the strange twists and turns of her segmented life, this film is dense with stunning images, interviews and revelations, painting a fitting and moving portrait of the artist. See it for the surprising story of this quixotic talent; see it for the skills of the film makers in presenting it so entertainingly; but most of all see it for the sublime photography.  Unmissable!

Cinema Gems: Finding Vivian Maier

Screen Gems:  a chance to view, discuss and enjoy good film in good company, with guided discussion after.  Tickets £5

“More connect-the-dots detective thriller than traditional doc, John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s revelatory riddle of a film unmasks a brilliant photographer who hid in plain sight for decades” Entertainment Weekly

This documentary is a tribute to Vivian Maier, an unsung genius of urban photography. The accidental discovery of her work by real-estate agent John Maloof resulted in her posthumous recognition as one of the finest street photographers of the 20th century.

Paying homage to her work as well as exploring the strange twists and turns of her segmented life, this film is dense with stunning images, interviews and revelations, painting a fitting and moving portrait of the artist. See it for the surprising story of this quixotic talent; see it for the skills of the film makers in presenting it so entertainingly; but most of all see it for the sublime photography.  Unmissable!

Grand Central

“An engrossing, superbly acted working-class melodrama.” Variety

“The film has tobacco on its breath and sweat rings under its arms.” Guardian

Gary (Tahar Rahim, A Prophet) is one of those people who life has promised nothing.  Moving from odd job to odd job, he finds himself employed in a nuclear power plant.  There, against the menace of the reactors, he at last finds what he’s been looking for: money, a team, a family.  He also finds forbidden love with the wife of one his team, the ever-sultry Lea Seydoux.

Almost unbearably intense, Grand Central was a prize winner in the Un Certain Regard competition at Cannes. The following is an excerpt rather than a trailer:

How to Train Your Dragon 2

“Not only does this second movie match the charm, wit, animation skill and intelligent storytelling of the original, I think it even exceeds it.” Chicago Sun Times

DreamWorks returns to the world of dragons and Vikings in this sequel. The original film followed the exploits of a Viking chief’s son, who must capture a dragon in order to mark his passage into manhood and prove his worthiness to the tribe.  Exciting, emotionally resonant, and beautifully animated, How to Train Your Dragon 2 builds on its predecessor’s successes just the way a sequel should.

Joe

“The film belongs to Cage. You can feel his compassion as Joe defies the reduced options of his life. There’s not an unfelt moment in Cage’s performance. Or in the movie.” Rolling Stone

A gripping mix of friendship, violence and redemption erupts in the contemporary South in this adaptation of Larry Brown’s novel, celebrated at once for its grit and its deeply moving core. Directed by David Gordon Green (Prince Avalanche) , this brings Oscar winner Nicolas Cage back to his indie roots in the title role as the hard-living, hot-tempered, ex-con Joe Ransom, who is just trying to dodge his instincts for trouble – until he meets a hard-luck kid, (Mud‘s Tye Sheridan) who awakens in him a fierce and tender-hearted protector.

Rich in atmosphere and anchored by a powerful performance from Cage, Joe is a satisfying return to form for its star — as well as director Green.

The Muppets Most Wanted

Disney’s “Muppets Most Wanted” takes the entire Muppets gang on a global tour, selling out grand theaters in some of Europe’s most exciting destinations, including Berlin, Madrid, Dublin and London. But mayhem follows the Muppets overseas, as they find themselves unwittingly entangled in an international crime caper headed by Constantine-the World’s Number One Criminal and a dead ringer for Kermit the Frog-and his dastardly sidekick Dominic, aka Number Two, portrayed by Ricky Gervais. The film stars Tina Fey as Nadya, a feisty prison guard, and Ty Burrell as Interpol agent Jean Pierre Napoleon.

Boyhood

“What an astonishing achievement; what a beautiful movie.” Guardian

No stranger to episodic filmmaking, Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise, etc.) succeeds brilliantly in following a boy’s life from the ages of six to 18, shooting periodically over 12 years. Cast as a young boy, Ellar Coltrane plays Mason, the son of Mason Snr and Olivia (Linklater regular Ethan Hawke + Patricia Arquette). As his divorced parents find new partners of varying suitability, Mason Jnr faces emotional and physical uncertainties with growing maturity. Whether he’s squabbling with his older sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater, the director’s daughter), arguing Star Wars lore with his dad or having his heart broken by an out-of-his-league first love, the film renders the apparently commonplace both unfamiliar and compelling. And while the changes Mason and Samantha undergo are obvious, they’re subtly matched by those of their parents in this unique collaborative feat.